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NZ Tech Podcast 339: Intel Compute Card, New Macs, Apple HomePod, iPad Pro comes of age, SpaceX recycling

This week: Intel Compute Card, News from Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference highlights incl new Macs, Apple HomePod, iPad Pro comes of age. SpaceX recycling rockets and capsules, 25% of Australians support a cashless society, Dubai’s Robot Cops.
Hosted by Paul Spain and featuring guests Mark Webster and Damien O’Carroll.

NZ Wine Podcast 21 Beaujolais: Wine Regions of France

This session has us exploring the often overlooked Beaujolais region; discovering what makes many wine enthusiasts obsess about these wines. Jean-Christophe Poizat & Marc Taddei take us on a quick journey through the wine regions of France.

Be You – The Fearless Kitchen 53

In this podcast episode I describe my arrival into the USA, as in my 20s I took up a Private Chef role with a family on Cape Cod.

Tech vs Caronavirus, Kashmir Internet partially restored, London Police turn on facial recognition cams – NZ Tech Podcast 473

Tech vs Caronavirus, Kashmir Internet partially restored, London Police turn on facial recognition cams – NZ Tech Podcast 473

Facial recognition tech rolls out in London, technology vs Coronavirus, India partially restores internet to Kashmir, NZ’s Imagr raises $14m for SmartCart tech, Vodafone Christchurch and Xone update from Michelle Sharp (former CEO, Kilmarnock Enterprises).Hosted by Paul Spain and this week’s guest: Michelle Sharp.

Listen to the Podcast here:

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You can keep current with our latest NZ Tech Podcast updates via Twitter @NZTechPodcast, the NZ Tech Podcast website or the facebook page. Published by World Podcasts and Podcasts NZ

Gorilla Technology
Free Tesla Supercharging

Special thanks to organisations who support innovation and tech leadership in New Zealand by partnering with NZ Tech Podcast:
Sumo Logic
HP
Samsung
Vodafone NZ
Spark NZ
Vocus

Live in Christchurch via 5G, Toyota’s city of the future, NZ’s Dawn Aerospace, Death to Fax – NZ Tech Podcast 472

Live in Christchurch via 5G, Toyota’s city of the future, NZ’s Dawn Aerospace, Death to Fax – NZ Tech Podcast 472

This week we’re live via 5G from Christchurch and discuss Christchurch and NZ tech happenings plus, – is it possible to final put an end to fax machines, Toyota’s futuristic city, driverless vehicles, NZ’s Dawn Aerospace and more announcements from CES 2020.

Hosted by Paul Spain and this week’s guests: Andy Poulson and Steve Swallow.

Listen to the Podcast here:

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You can keep current with our latest NZ Tech Podcast updates via Twitter @NZTechPodcast, the NZ Tech Podcast website or the facebook page. Published by World Podcasts and Podcasts NZ

 

Special thanks to organisations who support innovation and tech leadership in New Zealand by partnering with NZ Tech Podcast:
Sumo Logic
HP
Samsung
Vodafone NZ
Spark NZ
Vocus

What’s the deal with Commercial Property?

What’s the deal with Commercial Property?

It’s still property investment, but unless you’ve done it before, it’s not what you think it is. 

In an environment of lower returns on investment across many asset classes and property in particular, in order to get a good return, you have to factor in the expected capital gains. With residential property, there’s generally a trade-off between getting a good yield (good rent relative to the value of the property), with expected capital gains. An Auckland 3 bedroom home may go up in value better over time, compared to a 3 bedroom home in say Hamilton, which could provide a better yield.

Commercial property is different:

  • The tenant usually pays for all outgoings
  • You can influence the value more directly by improving the lease terms
  • Access to lending is often a bit tighter, and more expensive
  • Vacancies can last longer, but there could be more certainty with cash flow over time

On the whole, there are more positives than negatives and it’s a true-ism that residential property investors often ‘grow up’ to be commercial investors later on.  I can see why.

There is, however, a huge elephant in the warehouse here – the barriers to entry are higher with commercial . Not only do commercial properties often cost a lot more than residential, but if purchasing direct, you have to have a much higher deposit to even get a foot in the door.

Jack and Brandon have a broad discussion with me around the benefits of commercial property as well as touch on some different ways you can partake in this investment: Direct, through a syndicate and through a fund (unlisted or listed).

We’ve discussed listed property funds already on the show with Dean Anderson from Kernel and also with Di Papadopolous from Booster if you want to check that out also.

This is a must-listen for anyone thinking of getting into a commercial property at some stage. Newland Burling, the company Jack and Brandon work for, also do a commercial property master class and it’s a worthwhile exercise to head along – let them know you found them via this podcast. You won’t get a deal but you’ll be the teacher’s pet!

What is Sharesies?

What is Sharesies?

Democratisation – the action of making something accessible to everyone.

Giving the person with 1 cent the same opportunities as the person with $1m is one of the foundation principles used by the founders of Sharesies to bring their product to the market.

Traditionally, would be ‘wealth-developers’, have been locked out of investing unless they had significant sums to invest. It just wasn’t possible or if it was, it wasn’t cost-efficient. Sharesies pioneered the practice of ‘fractionalisation’ with investing, enabling more people to come to the party with what they had. The result? Over 70,000 Kiwi’s now have a Sharesies account and the average balance is sitting at over $2k each.

It’s been over a year since I caught up with the Sharesies team and a lot has happened since then. Yes, there are more players in this space, with Kernel Wealth, Hatch, and Invest Now to name a few. The good news is that the ‘pie’ of everyday Kiwi’s playing the game is growing.

Focusing on the everyday investor, Sharesies enables those with smaller amounts to invest in not only exchange-traded funds, but now also shares listed on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX). This is massive.

The other thing Sharesies does incredibly well is that it allows an account to be set up for children. From personal experience, I have struggled to teach my kids about investing, but having this tool is a great assist.

If you would like to learn more, check out sharesies.nz

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Like what you’ve heard?

You can really help with the success of the NZ Everyday Investor by doing the following:

1- Tell your friends!

2- Write a review on Facebook, or your favourite podcast player

3- Help support the mission of our show on Patreon by contributing here

4- Search for The Everyday Investor on YouTube

5- Sign up to our newsletter here

NZ Everyday Investor is on a mission to increase financial literacy and make investing more accessible for the everyday person!

__________________________________________________________________

Where to find Darcy Ungaro:

Ungaro &Co (registered) financial advisers

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UFinServ/?ref=bookmarks

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ungaro.co.nz/

Can you, should you, buy a holiday home?

Can you, should you, buy a holiday home?

Buying a holiday home – a checklist

In this bonus episode, I’m giving you a checklist of sorts to deal with the question – is buying a holiday home a good idea?

Owning your own home is awesome and if you’ve done this, well done. Increasingly this is harder to accomplish so I know if you’ve claimed your turf in the great land grab you’ve accomplished something awesome. A home is a base for life really and financially, there’s a long term benefit to owning property. Specifically, you can use the equity (or the distance between your mortgage and the market value of your home), to support a request to ask for more money from a bank. Money that you’d then use to buy something else. That ‘something else’ could be investment properties, shares, or potentially a holiday home too.

So here’s a checklist of considerations for you, designed to answer that question – should I buy a holiday home?

1 – Where should I buy a holiday home?

If you have kids, you’re going to go crazy driving there if it’s more than 2 hours away. Now hang on, some of the best places to be are often more than 2 hours away right? Yep, and that’s because the carloads of people just like you and your rotten children can never make it that far.

On the flipside think about transport in the future– with autonomous cars arriving at some point, destinations that are 3 hours away now could actually be 2 hrs away in the future – maybe even less with our self-flying Uber-esque drones. Buying a holiday home on an island appeals to me, but if there’s no regular ferry service, your access is limited by weather.

Now looking through the lens of a property owner who thinks every property should always grow in value, consider the fact that values of holiday homes are volatile and the market is illiquid. The prices can go up quickly, then fall away just as fast. The price you pay in holiday home areas are a direct function of the property prices in the big city centres – when times are good and interest rates are low, demand for these types of property increase, and you end up paying more for it. While you may not be buying the holiday home as a financial investment, if you are borrowing to fund it and the value decreases, a negative change in value could have flow-on effects the next time you go to the bank and ask for money for other moves (like renovations or investment properties as an eg).

So where you buy is an important question to consider – even though you’re not doing it to make a gain in value potentially, it still has financial implications if you’re growing your base of wealth.

2 – What type of holiday home is the best?

The short answer here is – simple homes.

The more intricate and special your property is, the more headspace it will occupy. Not only will you potentially resist having people over, you’ll find it hard to get help remotely to maintain your property. If you’re not handy at doing stuff, learn how to do stuff or stay away from anything that’s not simple.

Do you anticipate that the family will join you on holiday? Well, for some of us, you don’t really want to provide free accommodation to all the people you just endured Christmas with. For others though, and bless you, good people, this is exactly what you want – a nice big bit of dirt with perhaps access to parts of your home even when you’re not there, just to make it easier for others to camp out – if they ask nicely.

The type of property you purchase is a function of how you intend on using it though – there’s no simple answer to this one.

3 – What are the bank rules around buying a holiday home?

Bank rules always change so I’m going to talk generally here.

If you have sufficient equity in your home, and sufficient income too, you could borrow the full purchase price of a holiday home without using the holiday home as security. What this means is that the new holiday home is just another mortgage account with your bank, and your own home is the only asset that supports that debt. I like this idea as your holiday home becomes like a wee ‘container of equity’ that is not at risk in the event of default.

If you have still some equity in your home but not enough to that though, the bank will lend you a portion of what the purchase price is on the holiday home– somewhere between 70-80% depending on where it is and how much land there is.

Banks like to know things like: Where is it located – are there other holiday homes in the area or have you just bought the most undesirable piece of dirt imaginable in the entire country? Are their services to the boundary like water, power, internet etc? How much land is involved and will you be using the land to generate income in any way?

If you are dependant on the income that could come in from a holiday home purchase, to support a request for bank funding, they may likely consider that holiday home as an investment property – this is a key consideration as the bank rules change somewhat if that is the case.

A pretty cool thing that banks are good with though, is that they will generally only require 20% the price if you are buying bare land, so long as services are at the boundary. Why this is pretty neat, is that apart from the fact you can buy a place to pitch a tent still pretty cheaply around some parts of NZ, it’s sometimes a genuine pathway for those who are locked out of property ownership Can’t afford to purchase a home? – buy some land somewhere remote instead! I’m not suggesting you do that of course and there are a whole host of reasons why that may not actually be a good idea for you – but the access point here is pretty good.

4 – What should I consider if renting out my holiday home?

This is where the financial and non-financial paradigms collide.

Let me reiterate something here again – owning a holiday home should not really be considered an investment. With the rise of Airbnb and bookabach though, it’s now possible to trade some empty space for revenue – great for covering some of your costs, but there are some very key considerations here.

This area, from a tax point of view, is loaded with traps and please seek professional tax advice here, especially if you will rent out the property and the home is going to be owned via a family trust.

5 – Buying a holiday home with friends?

The same considerations that you’d have if purchasing a home or an investment property applies to you if considering a purchase of a holiday home with friends

It kind of makes sense with holiday homes for each party to borrow a bit of the purchase price, potentially secured only against each of their family homes, tip it into the pot and then pay cash for a property.

Providing there is not a mortgage on the holiday home, this is a fairly uncomplicated way to do things. If mortgage debt is required and you need to use the holiday home as security the bank, let’s just say that you should proceed with extreme caution – like anything here actually, seek professional advice.

Buying with friends makes a lot of common sense here – If someone is going to be the co-ordinator and there’s a fair system in dividing up the use, then this is actually a great way to own an asset which for the most part, should really just be considered a lifestyle asset. Same as a boat – you’re not using the vast majority of the time so why do you need to own the whole thing?

There you go – 5 of the first questions to ask before you go down this path and own another slice of NZ!

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Like what you’ve heard?

You can really help with the success of the NZ Everyday Investor by doing the following:

1- Tell your friends!

2- Write a review on Facebook, or your favourite podcast player

3- Help support the mission of our show on Patreon by contributing here

4- Search for The Everyday Investor on YouTube

5- Sign up to our newsletter here

NZ Everyday Investor is on a mission to increase financial literacy and make investing more accessible for the everyday person!

__________________________________________________________________

Where to find Darcy Ungaro:

Ungaro &Co (registered) financial advisers

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UFinServ/?ref=bookmarks

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ungaro.co.nz/

Year in Review: ACT’s Achievements in 2019

Year in Review: ACT’s Achievements in 2019

 In this episode of Politics in Full Sentences, we look back at ACT’s achievements in 2019, including the passage of the End of Life Choice Bill, being the only party to hold Labour to account on free speech, rushed firearms law and the flawed Zero Carbon Bill, and helping to defeat Labour’s capital gains tax and radical education proposals. 

Listen now, or Subscribe free:

Apple Podcasts  Spotifypodcasts   

Free Speech

ACT New Zealand
Politics in Full Sentences – Podcasts NZ
School of Practical Politics

 

David Cunningham: CEO, The Co-operative Bank

David Cunningham: CEO, The Co-operative Bank

David Cunningham shares his business journey and that of The Co-operative Bank – and his challenge to business leaders to ‘do good’ and donate to charitable causes through The Good Registry.

Listen to the Podcast Here:

Show Links:

Gorilla Technology
Paul Spain – LinkedIn
Paul Spain – CEO, Business & Tech Commentator, Futurist
One Plus One Communications

You can keep current with our latest NZ Business Podcast updates via Twitter @NZ_Business, the NZ Business Podcast website.

Land – Owning a slice of the action

Land – Owning a slice of the action

Yes, it’s property investment, but not as you know it! Increasingly, there are new options now where everyday Kiwi’s can partake of the benefits of property investment without directly holding it.

We’re moving, quickly, into a world where access to traditional assets is under pressure. Those that have, continue to accrue. Those who don’t have, are left further behind. Contained in this problem however, is a significant opportunity. Can (should) government help? Will complaining do anything? I doubt it. Here’s what I do know though – private enterprise is rising to the challenge yet again to address the gap between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’.

Owning property directly will become more challenging in the new world. When you understand the role of a fund manager and custodial service however, you can begin to see how property fractionalisation could be the cure to multiple challenges at once. The PLPF is yet another manifestation of financial innovation occurring from established players in the market.

Di Papadopoulos from Booster joins me in the studio today. We’re discussing the following:

1 – What’s PLPF?

2 – What does Booster do?

3 – How do fund managers view financial advisers?

4 – Kids and money

5 – Investing in New Zealand

Go here to learn more about the PLPF, including what it stands for.

Check out the blog on kids $50 challenge here

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Special announcement

Thanks to our friends at Hatch, we have $300 to give away to a lucky member of the NZ Investor Community.

Important two things you need to do to enter the draw.

1- To be eligible for this prize draw, Sign up to our newsletter here

2 – To be eligible for draw, you also need to have a Hatch account – sign up here but don’t worry, you don’t have to deposit any funds if you don’t want to. Tip: Don’t enter this draw unless you have a Hatch account.

More t’s and c’s:

Only sign up to newsletter using one email address per person

If you win, Hatch will credit funds into a valid Hatch account matching your name and email address used to join our newsletter.

Prize draw to occur on the 19th of December and winner notified by email and via Facebook – If no response received within 24 hours, we’ll revert to another back up name

_________________________________________________________________

Like what you’ve heard?

You can really help with the success of the NZ Everyday Investor by doing the following:

1- Tell your friends!

2- Write a review on Facebook, or your favourite podcast player

3- Help support the mission of our show on Patreon by contributing here

4- Search for The Everyday Investor on YouTube

5- Sign up to our newsletter here

NZ Everyday Investor is on a mission to increase financial literacy and make investing more accessible for the everyday person!

__________________________________________________________________

Where to find Darcy Ungaro:

Ungaro &Co (registered) financial advisers

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UFinServ/?ref=bookmarks

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ungaro.co.nz/